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cool pics i found of ww2 tanks after the war


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havoky #21 Posted 08 November 2013 - 03:47 AM

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nice find bruv

                                                                    

 

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Lornitz #22 Posted 09 November 2013 - 03:26 AM

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I guess some of the tanks were salvaged and same for preservation in tank or historical museums across Europe.

But then, there are only few of them which were saved from scrapping.
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THE_MARK_OF_CAIN #23 Posted 05 December 2013 - 07:26 AM

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Yes it was a scrappies wet dream plundering their way through these steel corpse graveyards dismantling history but at the time it wasn't  even a consideration as economically Europe was ravished and rebuilding and materials were vital. With hindsight you see how much WW 2 vehicles sell for these days and it does make you wince seeing such historically important vehicles going under the blow torch and to the smelters.

What is even more henious is the treatment of extremely rare WW2 pieces which were destroyed by countries long after the war. Check out Britain's treatment of the rare Panther 2 turret...... sat on a gunnery range for target practise :sad:  There were quite a few gunnery ranges in Europe which had German AFV's sitting on target ranges being turned into swiss cheese right up until the 70's. Hell they even destroyed an E 100 chasis failing to recognise the historical importance of such a vehicle.

Aussienator #24 Posted 05 December 2013 - 01:16 PM

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View PostTHE_MARK_OF_CAIN, on 05 December 2013 - 07:26 AM, said:

Yes it was a scrappies wet dream plundering their way through these steel corpse graveyards dismantling history but at the time it wasn't  even a consideration as economically Europe was ravished and rebuilding and materials were vital. With hindsight you see how much WW 2 vehicles sell for these days and it does make you wince seeing such historically important vehicles going under the blow torch and to the smelters.

What is even more henious is the treatment of extremely rare WW2 pieces which were destroyed by countries long after the war. Check out Britain's treatment of the rare Panther 2 turret...... sat on a gunnery range for target practise :sad:  There were quite a few gunnery ranges in Europe which had German AFV's sitting on target ranges being turned into swiss cheese right up until the 70's. Hell they even destroyed an E 100 chasis failing to recognise the historical importance of such a vehicle.

Its not as doom & gloom as that, sure, in retrospect we are shocked that these machines were scrapped, at the time, when a new tank was captured, samples were taken to see the properties & rolling Techniques & then, if already a wreck, taken out the range to test their AT Guns & any new Rounds in development.

The E100 was identified as unique & the Cost of shipping it to the UK for further studies was put up by the Government even though there were other more major priorities like housing & feeding the starving German Population.
It was a Hull only & was sampled & Tested & once done, melted down into Pots & Pans that the Brits needed, they gave up all the metal in their homes at the start of the War.

That Turret would of been Tested & then left on the Range as a Target, it wasn't good for anything else at that time.